Two Arrested in Killings of Transgender Women in Puerto Rico…

0By Michael Levenson and Sandra García | The New York Times

A week after the bodies of two transgender women were found in a badly burned car in Puerto Rico, the police said Thursday that they had arrested two men in connection with the killings and had turned them over to the F.B.I.

The men, Juan Carlos Pagán Bonilla, 21, and Sean Díaz de León, 19, were taken into custody on Wednesday but have not been charged, according to Capt. Teddy Morales, the chief of criminal investigations for the police in Humacao, on Puerto Rico’s eastern coast, where the women’s remains were found on April 22.

He said the F.B.I. had taken over the case and was investigating Mr. Bonilla and Mr. de León for possible civil rights violations.

“We are classifying it as a hate crime because they were socializing with the victims, and once they found out they were transgender women, they decided to kill them,” Captain Morales said on Thursday.

The police said they were waiting for autopsy results to determine how the women had been killed. Activists have identified the women as Layla Peláez, 21, and Serena Angelique Velázquez, 32, two friends who lived in New York City. Their remains were found after a person called 911 to report a burned car under a bridge on a desolate road in Humacao, just before 5 a.m. on April 22, Captain Morales said.

Mr. Bonilla and Mr. de León had been socializing with Ms. Velázquez and Ms. Peláez on the night before they were killed and were recorded on one of the women’s social media accounts, Captain Morales said.

He said the police had also tied Mr. Bonilla and Mr. de León to the killings through security camera footage and “scientific evidence,” which he declined to detail. Mr. Bonilla confessed to participating in the killings, and Mr. de León turned himself in, he said.

Limary Cruz-Rubio, a spokeswoman for the F.B.I.’s San Juan field office, declined to discuss the arrests but said the bureau routinely collaborates with local, state and federal agencies.

“The Bureau is and will always be interested in criminal conduct which may fall within federal jurisdiction,” she said. “However, our policy is we do not to confirm or deny the existence of investigations, to protect the integrity of any possible investigative effort.”

Mr. Bonilla and Mr. de León could not immediately be reached for comment on Thursday night, and it was not immediately clear if they had lawyers. If the men are charged, it could represent a turning point in the handling of crimes against L.G.B.T.Q. people in Puerto Rico, which has a disturbing history of violence against gay and transgender people, activists said.

Ms. Velázquez and Ms. Peláez were the third and fourth transgender people killed in Puerto Rico in the last two months, activists said. They were also believed to be the seventh and eighth transgender or gender-nonconforming people to have been killed in the United States this year, according to the Human Rights Campaign.

In the past 15 months, 10 L.G.B.T.Q. people have been killed in Puerto Rico, according to Pedro Julio Serrano, a gay rights activist. All but three of the deaths remain unsolved, he said.

“These arrests are a step in the right direction, but these murders have to be prosecuted as hate crimes,” Mr. Serrano said. “We urge the government to finish the investigations in the other seven murders of L.G.B.T.Q. people on the island and serve justice for all of them.”

Ms. Velázquez lived in Queens and Ms. Peláez in the Bronx. Both had recently traveled to Puerto Rico, and they were planning to fly back to New York later this month, according to family members and activists.

Luz Melendez, 29, Ms. Peláez’s cousin, said Mr. Bonilla and Mr. de León were arrested after a local radio station posted images of them on Facebook and people began to call the station to identify them.

“We are super appreciative of the work that the officials and the community put in to find who did this,” she said on Thursday.

She said the images came from two videos that Ms. Peláez had posted on her Snapchat and Facebook accounts, which showed her and Ms. Velázquez socializing with Mr. Bonilla and Mr. de León.

“I saw the videos, and it seemed like they were spending time together as friends,” she said. “It seemed normal. There was music playing in the background. Everyone seemed fine.” She said the police had told her family only that the men were in federal custody.

The killings came a month after Yampi Méndez Arocho, a 19-year-old transgender man, was killed in Moca, P.R., according to the Human Rights Campaign.

In February, Alexa Negrón Luciano, a well-known figure on Puerto Rico social media who was transgender and homeless, was shot to death after a McDonald’s customer complained that Ms. Negrón had spied on her in the women’s room.

Ms. Negrón’s final moments — framed in the headlights of a car amid a cackle of laughter — were posted on social media, a fact that activists said underscored the impunity homophobic attackers feel when committing such crimes.

La confesión del doble homicidio establece que fue un crimen de odio…

collageAunque el activista de derechos humanos Pedro Julio Serrano se mostró satisfecho por el arresto de dos sospechosos en el doble homicidio de mujeres trans en Humacao, exigió que se catalogue este caso como un crimen de odio y pidió que esclarezcan los otros 7 asesinatos de personas LGBTTIQ+ que han ocurrido en los pasados 15 meses.

“Aunque satisface el arresto de dos sospechosos en el caso de los asesinatos de Serena Velázquez y Layla Peláez, la realidad es que es solo el principio. Falta que los procesen como crímenes de odio, ya que la confesión denota que al enterarse de la identidad de género de las víctimas fue que planificaron y ejecutaron los asesinatos. Eso es un crimen de odio: asesinar a alguien por prejuicio por alguna característica de la víctima”, aseveró Serrano.

“Falta, además, que se resuelvan los otros siete asesinatos de personas LGBTTIQ+ en los pasados 15 meses. Falta, también, que presenten un plan de vigilancia y prevención de estos crímenes motivados por prejuicio a nuestra orientación sexual e identidad de género”, continuó el activista.

Además de Serena y Layla, en los pasados 15 meses han sido asesinados —en una ola de violencia homofóbica y transfóbica— Kevin Fret, Alexa Negrón Luciano, Emilio Colón, Penélope Díaz, Javier Morales, Carlos Robin Morales, Yampi Méndez y Luis Díaz. En estos siete casos, la Policía no ha presentado el estatus de las investigaciones y hasta hay señalamientos de que pudieron haber malogrado la investigación en el caso de Alexa.

En el caso de Penélope, ya se arrestó a un sospechoso que confesó asesinarla en la cárcel de Bayamón. Sin embargo, la Policía no ha ofrecido información sobre las investigaciones acerca de los ataques a personas LGBTTIQ+ en los que las víctimas han sido heridas en el área de descanso del Monumento al Jíbaro el año pasado.

“Que quede claro: estos arrestos no significan que esta epidemia de violencia anti-LGBTTIQ+ ha terminado. Nos mantendremos vigilantes a que se esclarezcan todos los casos, que la Policía cumpla con sus protocolos sobre crímenes de odio y el trato a la gente LGBTTIQ+, que se haga justicia y sobre todo, que nunca vuelva a ocurrir un crimen de odio más en nuestra patria. Puerto Rico somos todos y las personas LGBTTIQ+ merecemos vivir en paz, equidad y libertad”, concluyó Serrano.

Puerto Rico government sharply criticized over response to LGBTQ murders…

64571640_2321426004563495_5838703727594176512_nBy Michael Lavers | Washington Blade

Dozens of activists and advocacy groups have sharply criticized the government of Puerto Rico over its response to the murders of several LGBTQ people on the island.

Pedro Julio Serrano, founder of Puerto Rico Para Tod@s, a Puerto Rican LGBTQ advocacy group, on Wednesday noted during a Zoom press conference that 10 LGBTQ Puerto Ricans have been murdered over the last 15 months. They include Alexa Negrón Luciano, a homeless transgender woman who was killed in Toa Baja on Feb. 24.

Authorities last week found the bodies of Serena Angelique Velázquez and Layla Pelaez, who were both trans women, in a car in Humacao that had been set on fire. Penélope Díaz Ramírez, who was also a trans woman, was killed in a Bayamón jail on April 13.

Kevin Fret, a well-known gay trap artist, was murdered in San Juan’s Santurce neighborhood on Jan. 10, 2019.

“They are hunting us,” said Serrano during the press conference. “They are killing us.”

Natasha Alor, a trans activist in Puerto Rico, said she is “tired of living in fear.” Alor added many trans people in the U.S. commonwealth are afraid to leave their homes.

“It is very said that there are people in this country who are afraid to go out in the street just because of who they are,” said Alor.

The press conference took place hours before the Puerto Rico Police Department announced the arrest of two men in connection with the murders of Velázquez and Pelaez.

Puerto Rico’s hate crimes and nondiscrimination laws include both gender identity and sexual orientation, but prosecutors in the U.S. commonwealth rarely apply them. Serrano and other activists who participated in the press conference have repeatedly said Puerto Rican authorities’ response to anti-LGBTQ hate crimes remains woefully inadequate.

The Broad Committee for the Search for Equity, a coalition of LGBTQ advocacy groups known by the acronym CABE, on Monday demanded a meeting with Puerto Rico Public Safety Director Pedro Janer and Puerto Rico Police Commissioner Henry Escalera. A press release that CABE released after Wednesday’s press conference said activists plan to “demand answers on the status of the investigations (into the LGBTQ Puerto Ricans’ murders), the plan for surveillance and prevention of these crimes, as well as a guarantee that the processes will be carried out in accordance with the protocols and free of prejudice.”

“We are seeking justice for each one of the victims,” said Serrano during the press conference.

Many of the activists who spoke also sharply criticized Puerto Rico Gov. Wanda Vázquez over her administration’s response to the murders.

Vázquez — a member of the pro-statehood New Progressive Party — in response to Negrón’s murder urged anyone with information to contact authorities. Vázquez in a tweet also said authorities “will work with the diligence and sensitivity the case merits.”

The governor has not publicly responded to the murders of Velázquez, Pelaez and Díaz. Vázquez has also not commented on the case of Yampi Méndez Arocho, a trans man who was killed in Moca on March 5.

Vázquez last August succeeded then-Gov. Ricardo Rosselló, who resigned after a series of homophobic and misogynistic messages between him and members of his administration became public. Vázquez was Puerto Rico’s justice secretary before she became governor.

“Wanda Vázquez’s silence is deafening,” Serrano told the Blade during Wednesday’s press conference. “Her silence makes her complicit in these murders.”

CABE spokesperson Carmen Milagros Vélez Vega also criticized Vázquez, noting the Puerto Rican government and its institutions have close ties with anti-LGBTQ fundamentalist churches.

“What they have done is promote hatred in this country and they have given people permission to use their hands to kill our brothers and sisters and to terrorize everyone,” added Vélez, referring to the churches.

Denuncian “epidemia” de violencia homofóbica y transfóbica…

collagePor Alex Figueroa | El Nuevo Día

El Comité Amplio para la Búsqueda de la Equidad (CABE) reclamaron a las autoridades esclarecer los crímenes de lo que catalogó como una “epidemia de violencia” homofóbica y transfóbica.

Los portavoces de la entidad aludieron a 10 asesinatos en 15 meses, incluyendo cinco en los últimos dos meses, de personas de la comunidad LGBTTIQ.

Destacaron que de todos esos asesinatos, solamente uno se ha esclarecido, resaltando que si se logró fue porque ocurrió en una cárcel donde el responsable está confinado.

“Es indignante como mujer de entidad trans tener que recurrir a una conferencia de prensa para denunciar todo esto cuando se supone que la justicia sea para todos”, expresó Ivana Fred, portavoz de CABE, durante una rueda de prensa por Internet.

Agregó que para “los líderes que damos la cara para que se haga justicia esto es una falta de respeto, porque si los líderes no hablamos, el silencio prevalece. No me siento cómoda exponiendo esta situación, porque pongo mi vida en riesgo, pero si no lo hacemos, que pasará”.

“Nos están cazando y nos están matando. No hay otra forma de ponerlo”, afirmó.

Por su parte, el licenciado Osvaldo Burgos denunció que estos crímenes “no pueden quedarse en la impunidad. En la medida en que un asesinato no es investigado, los criminales piensan que se pueden quedar por la libre”.

Por el miedo que genera esta situación, Natasha Alor dijo que como mujer transgénero lleva “en cuarentena” desde antes de que comenzara el “lockdown” por el coronavirus COVID-19.

“Es triste que haya gente que tenga que vivir con miedo de salir a la calle”, manifestó Alor. “Estoy cansada de tener miedo… Llevo en cuarentena desde que mataron a Alexa”.

Alor se refería a Alexa Negrón Luciano, de 28 años, quien fue asesinada el pasado 24 de febrero en Toa Alta.

De los casos en los pasados cinco meses, señalaron los asesinatos de Penélope Díaz Ramírez, de 31 años, quien ahorcada en la cárcel de hombres de Bayamón; y de Yampi Méndez Arocho, hombre de identidad transgénero de 19 años que fue asesinado en Moca el pasado 5 de marzo.

También aludieron al doble asesinato la semana pasada en Humacao de Layla Peláez Sánchez, de 21 años, y Serena Velázquez Ramos, de 32 años.

El Nuevo Día solicitó una reacción al Negociado de la Policía de Puerto Rico. Se espera que se pronuncie durante el día de hoy.

“Denunciamos la homofobia y la transfobia que ha creado una ola de violencia en contra de la comunidad LGBTTIQ en Puerto Rico como no se había visto en más de una década”, manifestó Pedro Julio Serrano, también portavoz de CABE.

Según Carmen Vélez, profesora del Recinto de Río Piedras de la Universidad de Puerto Rico, el problema tiene una “raíz estructural”.

“Aquí hay unas narrativas que está detrás de todo y es una retórica estigmatizante, llena de odio a la comunidad LGBTTIQ en Puerto Rico. Es continua y constante”, expuso Vélez.

“Y en momentos de crisis en las sociedades, siempre los más vulnerables son los que la pagan”, abundó.

Vélez dijo que esa situación no solo provoca que las autoridades no atiendan los casos como se debe, sino que además afecta la cooperación de ciudadanos con información que pueda ayudar a esclarecer los crímenes.

Pero, resaltó que esa impacto no es tanto ciudadanos que no quieran cooperar por prejuicio, sino más bien por temor de acercarse a la comunidad LGBTTIQ a acercarse a las autoridades.

“Todo empieza con el interés de las autoridades de querer esclarecer. Entiendo que si buscan, encuentran, sobretodo en las comunidades, porque la gente está asustada y estas personas (víctimas) no son desconocidas”, expuso Vélez.

Abundó que “estos crímenes no ocurren en un vacío. Ocurren en una victimización que se va dando y se dan las quejas, pero no vemos en la Policía de Puerto Rico un aliado y a personas que se supone que nos defiendan. Detrás de ellos está el discurso homofóbico y fundamentalista de que nuestras comunidades valen menos, y de que alguna manera somos criminales también”.

“Si ante las personas que vas a ir a hacer la investigación son de las comunidades, y si piensas que esas personas no valen ni su voz, pues tu no vas a ir como testigo, porque sabes que no le van a dar valor a lo que digas como a lo que digan otras personas”, puntualizó.

A su vez, Burgos reclamaron que en las investigaciones no se proyecte el peso de la responsabilidad del crimen en las personas por el lugar donde estaban al momento que ocurrieron los hechos, mientras que Serrano y Fred lamentaron que en ocasiones la Policía deje en manos de la misma comunidad LGBTTIQ llevar a cabo la pesquisa, señalando, como ejemplo, el caso de Jorge Stephenson, provocando que se tengan que exponer públicamente.

“Existe un miedo a la Policía en la comunidad trans”, dijo Alor, quien aludió a información obtenida por la organización Kilómetro Cero, en el sentido de que oficiales “han visto agresiones hacia ella y no ha intervenido. Hay miedo, porque si acudimos a ellos, no hacen nada, porque no nos ven como seres humanos. Vieron cómo golpearon a una persona trans y no intervinieron”.

Entre los diez asesinatos señalados en los últimos diez meses, señalaron los de Emilio Colón, Javier Morales, Luis Díaz, Carlos Morales y el trapero Kevin Fred.

Serrano dijo que se dispone a someter una querella administrativa contra un policía para denunciar que le llamó para pedirle a personas de la comunidad LGBTTIQ a que no fueran al Monumento a Jíbaro en Salinas, donde han habido víctimas de asesinatos y agresiones, pese a supuestamente tener información sobre los responsables.

“Han ocurrido asesinatos en el Monumento al Jíbaro y la Policía no reportó que eran hombres gay y bisexuales que habían sido asesinados”, dijo Serrano. “La estrategia fue cerrar el área de descanso y lo que sucedió en esa área se movió a otra área baldía en Salinas y allí se encontró el cuerpo de Carlos Morales, desnudo y con aparentes signos de violencia”.

“La Policía, en vez de hacer su trabajo e investigar, porque tienen información, porque un agente me llamó para indicarme que tenía información de quiénes habían cometido esos crímenes y de cinco personas que sobrevivieron a ataques allí. Pudieron haber sido más muertes y la Policía no hizo nada para atrapar a estos criminales y asesinos”, afirmó.

Puerto Rican activists call for action to address recent anti-LGBTQ violence…

la-homofobia-mata1

By Anagha Srikanth | The Hill

“They are hunting us and they are killing us,” said Pedro Julio Serrano, a spokesperson for the Broad Committee for the Search of Equity, or CABE in Spanish.

Serrano spoke during a press conference following the killing of two transgender women on April 23, identified by locals as 21-year-old Layla Peláez and 32-year-old Serena Angelique Velázquez, from New York City, whose bodies were found badly burned in a car. The two women are at least the third and fourth transgender people killed in Puerto Rico this year, including a transgender woman known as Alexa who was murdered after using the women’s restroom at a McDonalds in Toa Baja.

In the press conference, held over Zoom, CABE asked for police to disclose the status of investigations of several cases involving violence against LGBTQ+ Puerto Ricans. Puerto Rico Gov. Wanda Vázquez Garced addressed Alexa’s death in February, but has not specifically spoken about the recent killing of Peláez and Velázquez.

“We are asking the government of Wanda Vázquez Garced to denounce these killings and to say that hate crimes have no place in Puerto Rican society,” Serrano said.

According to CABE, 10 LGBTQ+ people have have been killed in the past 15 months, including five transgender people murdered in the past two months. Only one of the cases has been solved, according to Serrano, who said the killing occurred in a prison, where the culprit was already behind bars.

“The other nine victims have not had justice,” he said.

Between 2017 and 2018, the Federal Bureau of Intelligence reported a 34 percent increase in hate crimes against transgender people. In 2019, the Human Rights Campaign reported 26 transgender people killed in the United States, although other estimates put the number as high as 40.

“These are crimes that are structural, violence that is structural and the government is responsible for dealing with this at all levels,” said Carmen Velaz Vega during the press conference.

Violence against transgender people can be particularly hard to track, because police and media will sometimes misgender the victim, referring to their sex at birth. This is particularly common in Puerto Rico, where initial reports of Alexa’s death referred to a “man who was dressed as a female.” In response, hundreds of tweets and social media posts condemned her killing under the hashtags “Her Name Was Alexa” or, in Spanish, “Se Llamaba Alexa.”

“We haven’t seen this amount of violence in this magnitude in ten years. We have taken great strides in Puerto Rico to make sure hate crimes don’t happen, but they are happening again. Our people are in danger and they are living in fear,” Serrano said.

“Nos están cazando y nos están matando”…

1546266_645340345505411_365471279_nEl Comité Amplio para la Búsqueda de la Equidad (CABE) alertó sobre hoy una epidemia de violencia anti-LGBTTIQ+ en el país tras registrarse cinco asesinatos de personas trans en los pasados dos meses, esto, unido a cinco asesinatos de personas de las comunidades LGBTTIQ+ en el 2019.

“Nos están cazando y nos están matando. No hay otra forma de ponerlo. En los pasados dos meses han sido asesinadas cinco personas trans en un resurgir de violencia que no habíamos visto desde hace una década en nuestro país. Exigimos acción inmediata y urgente de parte del gobierno para atajar esta ola de violencia en contra de nuestra gente trans y LGBTTIQ+”, aseveró Ivana Fred, aliada de CABE.

CABE se refiere a los asesinatos de Kevin Fret, de Alexa en Toa Baja, de Yampi en Moca, de dos hombres ultimados en el Monumento al Jíbaro el año pasado, otro hombre cuya causa de muerte no se ha determinado y fue encontrado desnudo en Salinas a mediados de febrero, el doble asesinato en Humacao esta semana, una confinada ahorcada hace una semana y un hombre de 79 años que murió violentamente en su residencia en Caguas recientemente. Además, en el área de descanso del Monumento al Jíbaro han ocurrido varios ataques a personas LGBTTIQ+ en los que las víctimas han sido heridas.

“Exigimos que la Policía y el gobierno atiendan, de inmediato y con carácter de urgencia, esta crisis de violencia en contra de la gente LGBTTIQ+. Es su deber informar el estatus de las investigaciones y conducirlas de acuerdo a los protocolos establecidos de crímenes de odio, de trato a la gente trans y LGBTTIQ+ y conforme a la reforma de la Policía. Nos están matando y el gobierno mira hacia el otro lado. Esta emergencia de violencia es tan importante como la emergencia que estamos viviendo todos”, aseveró Pedro Julio Serrano, portavoz de CABE.

Las diez víctimas fatales de los pasados 15 meses responden a Kevin Fret, Alexa Negrón Luciano, Serena Angelique Velázquez, Layla Peláez, Emilio Colón, Penélope Díaz, Javier Morales, Carlos Robin Morales, Yampi Méndez y Luis Díaz.

“La violencia que estamos experimentando tiene su raíz en la retórica y acciones de odio de parte de los políticos y religiosos fundamentalistas que incitan a perseguir, demonizar y atacar a la gente LGBTTIQ+. Basta ya de usarnos como chivos expiatorios para sus agendas de división. Somos tan seres humanos como el resto de la sociedad y merecemos el mismo respeto, la misma libertad y la misma equidad”, dijo Carmen Milagros Vélez Vega, portavoz de CABE.

CABE cursó una carta, el pasado lunes 27 de abril, al Secretario de Seguridad Pública, Pedro Janer, y al Comisionado del Negociado de la Policía, Henry Escalera, exigiendo una reunión de inmediato con Janer y Escalera en aras de exigir respuestas a las interrogantes sobre el estatus de las investigaciones, el plan de vigilancia y prevención de estos crímenes, así como una garantía de que los procesos se llevarán de acuerdo con los protocolos y libres de prejuicio.

“La Policía tiene la obligación de divulgar el estatus de las investigaciones de al menos nueve asesinatos, una muerte sin causa determinada y varios ataques en los que personas LGBTTIQ+ han sido heridas desde enero de 2019. Es obligación del Estado atender esta epidemia de violencia anti-LGBTTIQ+. De igual forma, le corresponde al gobierno de Wanda Vázquez declarar no tan solo un estado de alerta máxima y asignación de recursos por la violencia de género, sino también por la violencia homofobica y transfóbica”, sentenció Osvaldo Burgos, portavoz de CABE.

Natasha Alor, joven activista de experiencia trans, exhorta a “crear una sociedad donde el respeto a la diversidad sea un valor, no un arma para atacar la vivencia de otro ser humano. Nuestras vidas experimentan violencia en cada segundo. Esto no tan solo es injusto, sino que es inhumano. Las personas de identidad trans exigimos respeto a nuestras vidas y la garantía de que se hará justicia para que estos crímenes no queden impunes y no vuelvan a ocurrir”.

Por último, Justin Jesús Santiago, aliado de CABE enfatizó que “es hora de que este gobierno demuestra que va a cumplir con su deber de proteger a las personas trans y la gente LGBTTIQ+. Reconocemos la emergencia por el Coronavirus, pero también existe la emergencia de violencia homofóbica y transfóbica que nos está matando. Es hora de actuar. No puede morir ni una persona LGBTTIQ+ más a causa del odio”.

Organizaciones que Suscriben:

  1. Alianza de Comercio LGBTTQ+ de PR
  2. Amnistia Internacional Puerto Rico
  3. Asociación de Psicología de Puerto Rico
  4. Bienestar Human Services
  5. Butterflies Trans Foundation
  6. CARIB
  7. Casa Juana Colon
  8. Casa Julia
  9. COAI, Inc.
  10. Colectivo Orgullo Arcoiris- PRIDE PR
  11. Colegio de Abogados y Abogadas de Puerto Rico
  12. Comite Organizador Desfile Orgullo Boqueron
  13. Concilio de Iglesias
  14. Coordinadora Paz para la Mujer
  15. Diversxs Puerto Rico
  16. EDUCAMOS
  17. Escuela Espírita Allan Kardec
  18. Federación de Maestros
  19. GLAAD
  20. Hause of Martell
  21. Hispanic Federation
  22. Human Rights Campaign
  23. Inter Mujeres
  24. Lambda Legal
  25. Latino Commission on Aids
  26. Mesa de Dialogo Martin Luther King
  27. Movimiento Amplio de Mujeres
  28. National Center for Transgender Equality
  29. National LGBTQ Task Force
  30. New York City Anti-Violence Project (AVP)
  31. Open Society Foundations, Proyecto Puerto Rico
  32. Organización Puertorriqueña de la Mujer Trabajadora
  33. Orgullo Boquerón
  34. OutRight Action International
  35. Poetas Sin Marcha
  36. Pro Mujeres
  37. Proyecto Matria, Inc.
  38. Puerto Rico para tod@s
  39. Sindicato Puertorriqueño de Trabajadores y Trabajadoras
  40. Spectrum
  41. Trans Youth Coalition
  42. Waves Ahead & SAGE Puerto Rico

Personas en su carácter individual:

  1.  Alejandro Santiago Calderón
  2. Albert Rodríguez
  3. Alegna Malavé Marrero
  4. Alvaro Brusi, Ingeniero
  5. Amarillys Muñoz, Psicóloga Clínica y Catedratica
  6. Angel Crespo, Trabajador Social
  7. Beatriz Gonzalez , Educadora
  8. Carlos Camuy
  9. Daniel Velázquez
  10. David Mejias
  11. Debbie Aruz, MD
  12. Desiree Cardoza
  13. Diannette Fantauzzi
  14. Doroti Santiago, Educadora
  15. Dra. América Facundo, Catedrática
  16. Dra. Lisandra Torres
  17. Dra. Mercedes Rodríguez
  18. Dra. Sarah Malavé
  19. Duane Kolterman
  20. Eduardo Nuñez Caldero, Comerciante
  21. Elizabeth Fernandez O’Brien, Artista
  22. Ellen Pratt, Catedratica Retirada
  23. Esther Vicente-Inter Mujeres
  24. Estrella Baerga Santini, Educadora
  25. Eva Ayala, Educadora
  26. Ilia Cornier, Agrónoma
  27. Irene La farga, Psicóloga Social Comunitaria
  28. Isabel Feliciano
  29. Jaime Vazquez-Bernier, Abogado
  30. Javier La farga, fotógrafo profesional
  31. Javier Nolla Vila
  32. Joey Pons
  33. Jorge Iván López Martínez
  34. Julian Silva
  35. Juliana Maria Acosta Velez, Estudiante UPR
  36. Justin Jesus Santiago
  37. Kayra Lee Naranjo
  38. Larry Emil Alicea- Presidente Federación Internacional de Trabajo Social América Latina y el Caribe
  39. Lcda. Verónica Rivera Torres, CLADEM
  40. Leonell Justiniano
  41. Lisa Morales, Profesora Universitaria
  42. Lorenza Ortiz, Educadora
  43. Luis Rivera Pagán Profesor Emerito de Teología Ecuménica (Princeton Theological Seminary)
  44. Luisa Acevedo-Jubilada
  45. Madeline Roman, Sociologa
  46. Maria Dolores Fernos, Abogada
  47. María E.Lara, Educadora
  48. Marilucy González-Inter Mujeres
  49. Mario Amílcar Torres Lara
  50. Marisol Pares Avila , Educadora
  51. Marisol Velez-Vega, Terapista Fisico
  52. Marlyn Souffont, Educadora
  53. Mary Cele Rivera Martinez, Abogada
  54. Mayra Cabrera-Ulloa, Audiologa
  55. Mayra Molinary, Artista Plastica
  56. Naira Lee
  57. Nicole Chacón
  58. Obispo Rafael Moreno
  59. Patricia Otón-Inter Mujeres
  60. Patricia Velez-Vega, Educadora
  61. Profesora Yanira Reyes
  62. Rev. Felipe Lozada  Montañez
  63. Ruth Otero, Catedratica UPR Retirada
  64. Simara Fierce
  65. Sylas Crow Cardoza
  66. Teresa Previdi, cineasta
  67. Wally Soto
  68. Will Tirado
  69. Zoraida Santiago, Antropologia Social

“They’re hunting us and killing us”…

64571640_2321426004563495_5838703727594176512_nThe Broad Committee for the Search for Equity (CABE in Spanish) alerted today to an epidemic of anti-LGBTQ violence in Puerto Rico after five trans people were killed in the past two months, plus five other LGBTQ+ people killed in the past fifteen months.

“They are hunting us and they are killing us. There is no other way to put it. In the past two months, five trans people have been killed in a resurgence of violence that we have not seen in our country for over a decade. We demand immediate and urgent action by the government to stop this wave of violence against our trans and LGBTQ people”, said Ivana Fred, a CABE ally.

CABE refers to the murders of Kevin Fret, Alexa in Toa Baja, Yampi in Moca, two men killed in the Jíbaro Monument last year, another man whose cause of death has not been determined and was found naked in Salinas in mid-February, the double homicide in Humacao this week, an inmate that was beaten and hanged a week ago, and a 79-year-old man who died violently at his residence in Caguas recently. In addition, in the rest area of the Jíbaro Monument there have been several attacks on LGBTQ people in which the victims have been critically injured.

“We demand that the Police and the government respond to this crisis of violence against LGBTQ people immediately and urgently. It is your duty to report the status of investigations and conduct them in accordance with established protocols for hate crimes, the correct treatment of trans and LGBTQ people and in accordance with the reform of the Police. They are killing us and the government is looking the other way. This epidemic of anti-LGBTQ violence is as important as the emergency that we are all experiencing right now”, said Pedro Julio Serrano, a CABE spokesman.

The ten fatal victims of the past 15 months respond to Kevin Fret, Alexa Negrón Luciano, Serena Angelique Velázquez, Layla Peláez, Emilio Colón, Penélope Díaz, Javier Morales, Carlos Robin Morales, Yampi Méndez and Luis Díaz.

“The violence we are experiencing has its roots in the hateful rhetoric and actions by fundamentalist politicians and religious leaders who incite violence, who persecute, demonize and attack LGBTQ people. Enough of using us as scapegoats for your divisive agendas. We are as human beings as the rest of society and we deserve the same respect, the same freedom and the same equity”, said Carmen Milagros Vélez Vega, a CABE spokesperson.

On Monday, April 27, CABE sent a letter to the Secretary of Public Security, Pedro Janer, and to the Commissioner of the Police Bureau, Henry Escalera, demanding an immediate and urgent meeting with Janer and Escalera in order to demand answers on the status of the investigations, the plan for surveillance and prevention of these crimes, as well as a guarantee that the processes will be carried out in accordance with the protocols and free of prejudice.

“The Police have an obligation to disclose the status of investigations into at least nine murders, one death without a specific cause and several attacks in which LGBTQ people have been injured since January 2019. It is the State’s obligation to address this epidemic of anti-LGBTQ violence. Even more so, it is up to the government led by Wanda Vázquez to declare not only a state of maximum alert and allocation of resources for gender violence, but also for homophobic and transphobic violence as well”, stated Osvaldo Burgos, a CABE spokesperson.

Natasha Alor, a young trans activist, called for “creating a society in which respect for diversity is a value, not a weapon to attack the experiences of another human being. Our lives experience violence every second of the day. This is not only unfair, it is inhumane. As trans people we demand respect for our lives and the guarantee that justice will be done so that these crimes do not go unpunished and do not happen again”.

Lastly, Justin Jesus Santiago, a CABE ally, emphasized that “it is time for this government to demonstrate that it is going to fulfill its duty to protect trans people and LGBTQ people. We recognize the Coronavirus emergency, but there is also the emergency of homophobic and transphobic violence that is killing us. It is time to act. Not one more LGBTQ person can die because of hatred.”

Organizations supporting this call to action:

  1. Alianza de Comercio LGBTTQ+ de PR
  2. Amnistia Internacional Puerto Rico
  3. Asociación de Psicología de Puerto Rico
  4. Bienestar Human Services
  5. Butterflies Trans Foundation
  6. CARIB
  7. Casa Juana Colon
  8. Casa Julia
  9. COAI, Inc.
  10. Colectivo Orgullo Arcoiris- PRIDE PR
  11. Colegio de Abogados y Abogadas de Puerto Rico
  12. Comite Organizador Desfile Orgullo Boqueron
  13. Concilio de Iglesias
  14. Coordinadora Paz para la Mujer
  15. Diversxs Puerto Rico
  16. EDUCAMOS
  17. Escuela Espírita Allan Kardec
  18. Federación de Maestros
  19. GLAAD
  20. Hause of Martell
  21. Hispanic Federation
  22. Human Rights Campaign
  23. Inter Mujeres
  24. Lambda Legal
  25. Latino Commission on Aids
  26. Mesa de Dialogo Martin Luther King
  27. Movimiento Amplio de Mujeres
  28. National Center for Transgender Equality
  29. National LGBTQ Task Force
  30. New York City Anti-Violence Project (AVP)
  31. Open Society Foundations, Proyecto Puerto Rico
  32. Organización Puertorriqueña de la Mujer Trabajadora
  33. Orgullo Boquerón
  34. OutRight Action International
  35. Poetas Sin Marcha
  36. Pro Mujeres
  37. Proyecto Matria, Inc.
  38. Puerto Rico Para Tod@s
  39. Sindicato Puertorriqueño de Trabajadores y Trabajadoras
  40. Spectrum
  41. Trans Youth Coalition
  42. Waves Ahead & SAGE Puerto Rico

People in their individual capacity:

  1.  Alejandro Santiago Calderón
  2. Albert Rodríguez
  3. Alegna Malavé Marrero
  4. Alvaro Brusi, Ingeniero
  5. Amarillys Muñoz, Psicóloga Clínica y Catedratica
  6. Angel Crespo, Trabajador Social
  7. Beatriz Gonzalez , Educadora
  8. Carlos Camuy
  9. Daniel Velázquez
  10. David Mejias
  11. Debbie Aruz, MD
  12. Desiree Cardoza
  13. Diannette Fantauzzi
  14. Doroti Santiago, Educadora
  15. Dra. América Facundo, Catedrática
  16. Dra. Lisandra Torres
  17. Dra. Mercedes Rodríguez
  18. Dra. Sarah Malavé
  19. Duane Kolterman
  20. Eduardo Nuñez Caldero, Comerciante
  21. Elizabeth Fernandez O’Brien, Artista
  22. Ellen Pratt, Catedratica Retirada
  23. Esther Vicente-Inter Mujeres
  24. Estrella Baerga Santini, Educadora
  25. Eva Ayala, Educadora
  26. Ilia Cornier, Agrónoma
  27. Irene La farga, Psicóloga Social Comunitaria
  28. Isabel Feliciano
  29. Jaime Vazquez-Bernier, Abogado
  30. Javier La farga, fotógrafo profesional
  31. Javier Nolla Vila
  32. Joey Pons
  33. Jorge Iván López Martínez
  34. Julian Silva
  35. Juliana Maria Acosta Velez, Estudiante UPR
  36. Justin Jesus Santiago
  37. Kayra Lee Naranjo
  38. Larry Emil Alicea- Presidente Federación Internacional de Trabajo Social América Latina y el Caribe
  39. Lcda. Verónica Rivera Torres, CLADEM
  40. Leonell Justiniano
  41. Lisa Morales, Profesora Universitaria
  42. Lorenza Ortiz, Educadora
  43. Luis Rivera Pagán Profesor Emerito de Teología Ecuménica (Princeton Theological Seminary)
  44. Luisa Acevedo-Jubilada
  45. Madeline Roman, Sociologa
  46. Maria Dolores Fernos, Abogada
  47. María E.Lara, Educadora
  48. Marilucy González-Inter Mujeres
  49. Mario Amílcar Torres Lara
  50. Marisol Pares Avila , Educadora
  51. Marisol Velez-Vega, Terapista Fisico
  52. Marlyn Souffont, Educadora
  53. Mary Cele Rivera Martinez, Abogada
  54. Mayra Cabrera-Ulloa, Audiologa
  55. Mayra Molinary, Artista Plastica
  56. Naira Lee
  57. Nicole Chacón
  58. Obispo Rafael Moreno
  59. Patricia Otón-Inter Mujeres
  60. Patricia Velez-Vega, Educadora
  61. Profesora Yanira Reyes
  62. Rev. Felipe Lozada  Montañez
  63. Ruth Otero, Catedratica UPR Retirada
  64. Simara Fierce
  65. Sylas Crow Cardoza
  66. Teresa Previdi, cineasta
  67. Wally Soto
  68. Will Tirado
  69. Zoraida Santiago, Antropologia Social